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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  February 23, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EST

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hello. i'm geeta guru-murthy. our top stories. oscar's glory for eddie redmayne as he wins best actor for "the theory of everything". >> i'm fully aware that i am a lucky, lucky man. this, this oscar -- >> the winners include julianne moore, who picked up suggest actress for "best alice." best film went to "birdman." a prominent pro-democracy activist in egypt is sentenced to five years in jail. getting rid of dirty needles. the w.h.o. recommends a new type
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of syringe to cut infections like hiv and hepatitis. hello and welcome. the film "birdman" has won the oscar for best picture and best director at the academy awards ceremony in hollywood. best actor went to eddie redmayne for his leading role in "the theory of everything," while the best actress award wednesday to julianne moore for "still alice." from hollywood, here's david willis. >> reporter: it's an evening of sumptuous glamour. the movie industry's big night out. a night when hollywood's new arrivals get to rub shoulders with some of the biggest stars on the planet. and everyone wants to talk to the man of the moment. patricia arquette was named best
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supporting actress for her role in "boyhood." she used her acceptance speech to make an impassioned appeal for equal rights for women. >> it's our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the united states of america. >> all themes in the acceptance speeches. a middle-aged woman's battle against early onset alzheimer's disease in "still alice" gained julianne moore a best actress honor. ♪ >> "glory," the theme from "selma" not only won best original song but brought the celebrity crowd to its feet. >> the oscar goes to eddie redmayne. >> a favorite for best actor, londoner eddie redmayne who played stephen hawking in "the theory of everything", nonetheless, could hardly believe his luck. >> i am fully aware that i am a
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lucky, lucky man. this oscar -- wow! >> "birdman," the story of a fading hollywood star played by michael keaton took four of the top honors including best film and best director. ♪ claim every mountain ♪ >> reporter: 50 years after "the sound of music," lady gaga channeled her inner julie andrews to perform a medley of songs, bringing the house down in the progress. david willis, bbc news in hollywood. ♪ 'til you find your dreams ♪ >> more this hour. what do you think of that? let me know. i'm on twitter. let's move on to the rest of the news. a court in egypt has sentenced prominent pro-democracy activist
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alaa abdel fattah for five years in jail for breaking a law that bans police protest without a permit. a short while ago, the bbc's sally nabil in cairo gave me an update on the verdict. >> reporter: yes, alaa fattah is a prominent political activist here in egypt. today has been given a five-year sentence, together with another political activist. there are 25 defendants in this case. the remaining the 23 we know that they have been given a three-year sentence each. this case has been severely criticized as being politically motivated. human rights activists say that the current regime is trying to silence any opposition force that tries to speak up against the authorities here. what we are getting from inside court, that once the ruling was announced, the families of the defendant, some of them fainted others cried, some of them even chanted slogans, saying "down
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with military rule." security forces then moved to evacuate the courtroom at once. what we are getting from the defendants' lawyers, as well is that this ruling is not final and they are still going to appeal it in front of the court of cessation, the highest court in the country. >> what about the al jazeera cases today? >> reporter: yes, it has been adjourned until the 8th of march. baher mohamed and mohamed fahmy were here, but the rest of the defendants, two of them were missing. so the judge decided to adjourn the whole case until the 8th of march when all of the defendants were present. fahmy's lawyer asked for more witnesses to appear in front of court, so they are waiting for the witnesses to come for all of the defendants to be present, to check the evidence and discuss the witnesses in the upcoming hearing on the 8th of march. >> sally nabil there. other news today, and one of the leading academic figures among sunni muslims has called for an overhaul of religious
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teachings to combat the spread of extremism. sheik ahmed al tayeb says a historical misreading of the koran has encouraged what he calls an intolerant interpretation of the koran. in thailand two students have been sentenced to 2 1/2 years of prison. they were convicted under thailand's law, which banned criticism of the royal family. the 40th anniversary of a anti-dictatorship uprising. at least 70 people are now known to have died in a ferry accident in bangladesh after authorities managed to reach the vessel, which caught fire on sunday. it was truck by a cargo boat after crossing the padma river. most of those who drowned were on the ferry's lower deck. dozens were rescued. witnesses say the ferry may have been overcrowded. north korea is banning
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foreign runners from competing in this year's pyongyang marathon as part of a precaution to stop the ebola from entering the country. despite almost four cases of ebola infection coming from west africa africa. ukrainian military says it won't pull back its heavy weapons from the conflict zone in the east of the country until pro-russian rebels is stop shelling its positions. well a truce is meant to be enforced in the area but the latest reports speak of continued fighting. and ukraine says the rebels have attacked its positions with artillery and small arms. bbc's david stern is in kiev. just explain these latest details for us david. >> reporter: well yes. this artillery pullback was actually supposed to start just 48 hours, or within 48 hours after the cease-fire began. the cease-fire was supposed to begin basically about ten days
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ago, saturday and sunday the previous weekend. obviously, the cease-fire hasn't begun. there's still sporadic shelling perhaps at a lower level than what we saw previously but it is continuing, especially around the donetsk city and the port of mariupol, and the ukrainian military, although having said that they would now begin the pullback of the artillery, along with the russian-backed rebels now says that they're going to -- that they cannot pull it back, as long as the firing is -- or the shelling is continuing. what the reaction will be from the rebels we're waiting to see whether they are going to start a unilateral withdraw or whether they too, will delay it. >> petrov poroshenko, meanwhile, the president of the ukraine, still sounding defiant over crimea. >> well, yes saying that ukraine will get crimea back. but at the same time, that's not too much of a surprise. ukraine, of course has never given up on getting back the
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crime crimean peninsula. they say they do not recognize russia's annexation of that. and even if it's not as mentioned as much in the press or perhaps in the discussions that are going on about what's going on in the east ukraine still very much considers crimea a part. the question is now, when or if it would come back. obviously, this is not happening anytime soon but, of course the ukrainian government their official position is that ultimately, the peninsula will be returned to ukraine. >> okay david. thanks very much. the world's health organization says smart syringes that break after one use should be used for injections by 2020. reusing syringes leads to more than 2 million people being infected with diseases, which include hiv and hepatitis every year. david shipley reports from cambodia. >> reporter: i'm in cambodia in the village of raqqa, which is in the grip of a health crisis, because more than 2 million here have been infected with hiv. they'd all been given injections
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by a local unlicensed medic, suspected of reusing syringes and needles. so the question is is there any way to avoid this kind of thing from happening again? well with me is mark koska, who's come up with a design for a better kind of syringe. mark talk us through the comparison of a normal syringe and your one. >> sure. this is a normal syringe, made in billions around the world, but because of the design you can use it as many times -- >> it's easy to refill. >> exactly. and you can't sterilize them. >> there's no way of doing that in a guaranteed way? >> no. so this is an auto-disable syringe, which after use locks, and then breaks -- >> that click is the break? >> exactly. so it can never be reused again. >> now, this idea seems blindingly obvious, but you've been pushing for this for, what 30 years. where's the resistance come from? >> i think there's resistance in many different points. from putting in legislation and
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policy to manufacturers changing over to a product, which quite frankly, isn't that exciting on an economic basis for them. >> they don't make a lot of money out of it? >> correct. so there are a combination of different barriers. but it seems that we've got the perfect storm. and now with all the components we will have a chance of putting these out around the world and replacing standard syringes forever. >> reporter: now, right now, here in raqqa, there are all of these people young children families infected with hiv. it must be incredibly frustrating for you to see that? >> it's amazingly traumatic for me to see this firsthand. i travel a lot and do see it everywhere i go. but it's also motivating, to make sure that this finally takes place on a global scale. >> is it conceivable that the world would switch to single-use syringes or syringes you just
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literally can't use again? >> it's totally, totally possible. we've already done this with immunizations, which represents less than 10% of the injections given in the developing world. and that has been a fantastic success. now we're targeting the 90% of what we call curative injections, the ones given here in raqqa, with reused equipment, which cause the problem. >> mark many thanks indeed. mark koska there. so, in fact today, the world health organization is announcing a new policy for the world to switch to syringes that can only be used once. they want that to happen by 2020. we'll have to see if that's going to be possible. >> david shipman there in cambodia. now we turn to business. hsbc still making headlines, aaron? >> still making their headlines with some numbers, not necessarily great numbers, absolutely geeta. thanks very much. hello there. yes, the british-based banking giant hsbc has reported a 17%
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fall in annual pre-tax profits to the number $18.7 billion. now, of course this just follows weeks of being in the spotlight over accusations at its swift division. aided large-scale tax avoidance and in some cases, tax evasion. this morning some claims are being made about this guy right here, the chief executive. "the guardian" reports that stewart gullver had a swiss account in which he put about $5.7 million of his own money through a panamanian company. lawyers for mr. gullver told "the guardian" that full uk tax had been paid on the entirety of his worldwide earnings less the credit, that is, for the tax paid in hong kong. his lawyers declined to answer questions on why he used a panamanian firm. we'll have more on that, coming up on "gmt." now, if you're a parent geeta, you may or may not -- just kidding. you may or may not like the sound of this because youtube,
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the online video streaming channel is going kid friendly. they're launching a new app that will be able to run on smartphones and tablets and allow children to watch supposed of their favorite tv shows. it will feature parental controls, very important, and remove all viewer comments. youtube not the only video service that launches their child-friendly service recently. last month, twitter launched the vine kids app. it is a youtube generation, isn't it? how about this one? you fancy a new career? well, it seems the that s thes that pilots are in huge demand. british airways has started its recruitment drive, but with the cost of training is it something to consider? according to boeing the world will need 533,000 new pilots in the next 18 years. we know it cost around $90,000, possibly up to $100,000 for the training, but are the salaries anything to write home about? according to the british airlines association, $60,000 is what you can earn on the lower
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end on large european carriers. we'll have more on this coming up on "gmt" in just over an hour's time. tweet me and i'll tweet you right back. i should say geeta, the big drive with british airways and the world, more female pilots. only 5% of all pilots in the world, female. they need more female pilots. >> thank you aaron. stay with us here on bbc world news. much to come. we have who picked up an oscar and what really matters, that's right, what were they all wearing. who seek more than just a little time off. the ones who choose to go big or stay home. ♪ come with me now ♪ where every amazing, despicable wizarding adventure reveals moments that are truly epic. this place is made for those who do more than just vacation ... ♪ whoa ♪ ♪ go with me now ♪ it's made for those who vacation like they mean it. universal orlando resort.
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gets sentenced to five years in jail for breaking a law that bans peace protests. another deadline for greece, as the government gives a list of reforms it's willing to make in return for an extension of a loan to cover its huge debt. the greek finance minister yanis varoufakis agreeded to a four-month extension if the deal is agreed to. our correspondent in athens, mark lowen, tells me more. >> reporter: we're expecting the greek government will submit that list of conditions it is willing to implement in return for the four-month loan extension in brussels. it will be considered by the european central bank and the imf. they will give their verdict tomorrow whether they believe it meets what they request of the greek government. if there is complete disagreement, the deal could collapse. if there is fine tuning needed
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greece has until april to do so with its certreditor institution. and that's when greece needs that $7 billion of aid disbursement. really, it's going to be kept on a pretty tight leash by the germans and others who want athens to try to stick to some of the conditions of the previous bailout. still, that tug-of-war goes on. >> and, is today an absolute definite deadline because a lot of these deadlines move as we keep saying. >> they do but today is a deadline, yes. and i think that greece is going to fix a deadline. it's been working feverishly over the weekend to draw up that list of demands. and interestingly, as for the question as to whether the greek voters, the voters of the government support it, well when you ask it about talking to people here you get the sense that a lot of them do. a lot of them feel that actually they were expecting a
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compromise. they weren't expecting the government to be able to follow through with everything they've promised. but if the creditors and if other eurozone governments request too much of the greek government, if they request greece to compromise even further, well then that support could be begin to ebb a little bit. because, of course siryriza was elected promising they would be able to raise the minimum wage, reconnect people's power who's been cut off, provide free food that kind of thing. they may have to compromise on these deals. it's a crucial moment whether support for the syriza government holds. bear in mind the political capital of this government at the moment is high. a very high popularity rating. in the sense now is the time to compromise and he will hope he can take the majority of his voters with him. now, two former british secretaries have referred themselves to the mp's standard commissioner under allegations
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of demanding cash for access. jake straw and marco rifkin were filmed as documentary makers as posing as staff as a chinese firm. they're seen as offering their services for thousands of pounds. our political editor has the details. >> reporter: these are two of the most experienced mps around. both are former senior cabinet ministers. both men were filmed by undercover reporters posing as representatives of a fake chinese company. jack straw is heard describing how he operated under the radar. he also talks about how much he charges for his advice. >> obviously, there's the -- if we get down the track, there's the issue of what the fee -- >> oh, of course i don't know if you have a daily rate in mind. >> normally it's $5,000 a day, that's what i charge. >> sir malcolm rifkin is said to have said he could see any foreign ambassador in london if he wanted so he could provide
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access that is useful. the mp is also heard saying he doesn't get a salary. >> i am self-employed, so nobody pays me a salary. i have to earn my income but when i'm not doing something, i can do what i like. >> jack straw has been suspended from the parliamentary labor party at his own request. in a statement, mr. straw said the discussions were about what i might do once i left the commons, not whilst i was still serving as an mp. sir malcolm told the bbc, i would not assist any company to acquire information that was not already public. he insisted this had no bearing on his role as the chairman of parliament's intelligence and security committee, which overseas the work of mi5 and mi6. a full investigation by parliament's commission of the standards is now certain, but that could take months. >> well sir malcolm ripkind has been speaking to the bbc.
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>> sir malcolm ripkind, you've been accused of using your experience as a politician to benefit a private company. was that appropriate? >> well it has been accepted by parliament and by our law for many, many years, that members of parliament as long as they declare any outside business interest in the register are free to take other employment. and what i do 70 75% of my time, is my parliamentary work. 20 25% of most are a number of business interests i have. and i think it's very important that that should be possible. i know the labor party doesn't like it and some other, many other people perhaps don't believe that mps should have second jobs but, you know, there's a large body of public opinion that thinks differently. we don't want to see full-time politicians who know nothing about the rest of the world and actually rather like knowing that members of parliament have interest in other parts of the economy. >> but isn't it different as an
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mv having an outside interest like a previous profession like a doctor or a lawyer and this sense of an mp offering themselves for hire. >> hold on first of all, i didn't offer myself. i don't offer myself. i was approached by this particular alleged company. they said we are wanting to establish an advisory board, because we want to consider an investment in britain and elsewhere in europe. we want a number of senior business people and senior political people on that advisory board, because we want to better understand the regulatory system the financial system, the political system of the countries we might be investing in. that's how it happened. so they said will you talk to us. i said yes, of course, aislei'll talk to you, but no commitment either way. >> so you did not offer yourself for hire but you entertained the -- >> you use that "for hire," as if it's derogatory. it's the world we live in people have particular experience and skills to try to use their skills to help their
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standard of living. very, very simple. and my experience for many years has been in foreign policy and european issues. most of the discussions i had with this so-called company, probably 80% of them had nothing to do with the united kingdom, they were wanting my views on investments in parts of continental europe france germany. these are areas i had experience of and that people are willing to renumerate me for sharing that experience parliament approves of it the law permits it it's in the member's interest. you can look at the register you'll see all my political interests, as you will any other member of the parliament. >> sir malcolm ripkind there. we know "birdman" was a big winner at the oscars but what really matters is what everyone was wearing. >> we leave you with these flash photography.
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our top stories. egypt jails a pro-democracy activist for five years for breaking a law that bans protests without a police permit. at the oscars eddie redmayne picks up best actor for "the theory of everything". >> thank you so much. i spent four months going around london, met many people their families and not only them but the hawking family. it's definitely a sad story. >> on hollywood's biggest night, other winners include julianne moore for best actress in "still alice," best supporting actress went to patricia arquette for
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"boyhood." and keeping the cash flowing. greece faces a deadline to detail reform. the eu bailout continues. hello and welcome. of course egypt has sentenced a pro-democracy activist alaa abdel fattah for five years in jail, for breaking a law that bans protest without a police permit. his lawyers say the charges are politically motivated and baseless. the bbc's sally nabil in cairo has this update. >> alaa fattah is a prominent political activist here in egypt. today he has been given a five-year sentence together with another political activist. there are 25 defendants in this case. the remaining 23 we know that
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they have been given a three-year sentence each. this case has been severely criticized as being politically motivated. human rights activists say that the current regime is trying to silence any opposition force that tries to speak up against the authorities here. what we are getting from inside court, that once the ruling was announced, the family of the defendants, some of them fainted, others cried. some of them even chanted slogans, saying down with military rule. >> sally nabil there. with me is ann rosette from bbc arabic. we call people liberal, pro-democracy were sympathizers with the muslim brotherhood. who is he? >> alaa fattah is an activist. he started his activism before the mubarak regime last fall. he had a blog and he was writing and publishing about the mubarak
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regime. and he took to the streets in the 2011 protests and he has been very vocal against mubarak's regime the military council and even the muslim brotherhood. his sister is still actually in prison as well. his youngest sister she was sentenced to two years in jail for breaking the protest law. >> so what is the significance of today? >> abdel al sisi talked about respecting the court and the law yesterday, and it's very significant, some people say it is a crackdown on different activism lines in egypt, whether it's muslim brother, islamist or more liberal and secular. but we will have to wait and see what's going to happen next because abdel fattah al sisi also hinted he might peril the
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activist youth. >> there have been a lot of al jazeera who are jailed. >> absolutely. al jazeera was more focused, because they are journalists, they are well know to the rest of the world. but also people in cairo and particularly activists took to the streets in 2011 were also demanding some focus on them. because basically, the charges are breaking the law protest, and there is a feel of -- a rising sentiment against this law and how constitutional it is. >> hanan, many thanks. >> thank you. the re-trial of the journalist who is face terrorism charges have been postponed for another two weeks. the journalists, mohamed fahmy and baher mohamed were released on bail earlier this month after they spent more than 400 days in
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prison. their colleague, arrested with them, the australian journalist peter greste who spoke to the bbc also he has been deported and released effectively, to australia earlier this month. let's get some other news. one of the leading academic figures among sunni muslims has called for an overhaul of religious teachings to combat the spread of extremism. sheik ahmed al tayeb says a historical misreading of the koran has encouraged what he described as intolerant interpretations of islam. a court in thailand has sentenced two students to 2 1/2 years in prison for staging a play which is ruled to have insulted the monarchy. they were convicted under thailand's laws that banned criticism of the royal family. the play staged in 2013 marked the 40th anniversary of an anti-dictatorship uprising by students and features a fictional monarch and his adviser. at least 70 people are now known to have died in ferry
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accident in bangladesh, after authorities managed to reach the vessel, which caught fire on sunday. it was struck by a cargo boat by crossing the padma, which is one of the country's biggest rivers. most of those who drowned were on the ferry's lower decks. dozens were rescued. witnesses say the ferry may have been overcrowded. now to the oscars. the film "birdman" has won the oscars for best picture and best director at the academy awards in hollywood. best actor went to eddie redmayne for his leading role in "the theory of everything." whilst the best actress award went to julianne moore for "still alice." from hollywood, here's david willis. >> reporter: it's an evening of sumptuous glamour. the movie industry's big night out. a night when hollywood's new arrivals get to rub shoulders with some of the biggest stars on the planet. and everyone wants to talk to the man of the moment. patricia arquette was named best
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supporting actress for her role in "boyhood." he used her acceptance speech to deliver an impassioned appeal for equal rights for women. >> it's our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the united states of america. >> a middle-aged woman's battle against early onset alzheimer's disease in "still alice" earned julie ann moore a best actress award. glory, the theme from "selma," not only won best original song but brought the celebrity crowd to its feet. >> the oscar goes to eddie redmayne. >> a favorite for best actor, londoner eddie redmayne who plays stephen hawking in "the theory of everything," nonetheless, could hardly believe his luck. >> i am fully aware that i am a
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lucky, lucky man. this, this oscar -- whoa! >> reporter: "birdman," the story of a fading hollywood star played by michael keaton took four of the top honors including best film and best director. ♪ climb every mountain ♪ >> reporter: 50 years since "the sound of music," lady gaga channeled her inner julie andrews to perform a medley of songs, bringing the house down in the process. ♪ 'til you find your dreams ♪ >> i like the original. let me know if you want to. we will have more on the oscars including a look at the main thing of all interest what were the stars wearing, plus how
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have the night's winners been celebrating. that's coming up in a few minutes, stay with us. we move to australia, because it's tackling its citizenship laws. the prime minister tony abbott made this announcement just a day after the release of a report of the sidney cafe siege. >> reporter: it's two months since australia's biggest ever anti-terrorism operation ended in a blaze of gunfire. and december's sydney siege, carried out by a man who claimed to be an islamic state supporter was clearly on tony abbott's mind as he introduced today's new proposals. >> now, i can't promise that terrorist atrocities will ever again take place on australian soil, but let me give you this assurance. my government will never underestimate the terror threat.
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we will make the difficult decisions that must be taken to keep you and your families safe. >> reporter: australia is increasingly concerned about the number of its citizens fighting overseas with islamic state. the government estimates there are 90 australians currently fighting with extremist groups in syria and iraq. and a further 30 who have already returned home. today, mr. abbott said some of them could lose their australian citizenship. >> we cannot allow bad people to use our good nature against us. the government will development amendments to the australian citizenship act, so that we can revoke or suspend australian citizenship in the case of geonationals. >> reporter: mr. abbott said australian nationals fighting with islamic state could have their entitlements to state benefits removed and have their travel restricted. in separate measures he said what he called hate preachers
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would be targeted. mr. abbott's critics accuse him of creating a climate of fear to distract from his own political problems including the recent questioning of his leadership style. but today, he said the country was facing a new long-term era of terrorism. john dollson, bbc news sydney. >> also in australia, the disgraced entertainer ross harris has been stripped of his honors following his convictions for child sex offenses. he was jailed for six years by a court in the uk last june. harris is originally an australian national that had been given two awards under the country's honor system. he currently still holds the title of cb here in britain. the world's health organization today launches a major initiative aimed at reducing infections caused by dirty syringes. the w.h.o will be backing the use of smart auto-disable syringes, which can't be used again.
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gary shipman reports from cambodia. >> reporter: i'm in cambodia in a little village of raqqa, a bit of a backwater, until now. this place has become the center of a national crisis because more than 200 people have been infected with hiv. what they all have in common is that they were treated by an unlicensed local doctor operating just behind me here. and the authorities suspect that he was reusing old syringes passing hiv from one person to another. the man behind all of this now faces charges of murder. he's under arrest. he was a popular local figure because he operated very low cost, but people here are now realizing the consequences of that. during our time here we met a family where the mother and four of her children have all been infected with hiv, just one of many examples here.
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perhaps most shocking, the an abbott abbott, the head of the local buddhist monastery, a man who's 82 and cellibatecelibate, has also revealed he's been infected and he's very worried about the impact on the local community. all of this comes as a the world health organization is increasingly concerned about number of countries where syringes are reused. not only spreading hiv, but also hepatitis and other forms of disease, which is why they are now today announcing a new policy, for a complete switch from syringes which you can reuse and therefore pass on infection to a new kind of syringe, which can literally be used only once. if you try to refill it it will simply break. every year, millions of people are infected by reused syringes and many of them die. the hope is this new initiative
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will bring that to an end. >> david shipman there in cambodia. stay with us here on bbc news more to come. more reaction to the oscars, include whaging what the stars were wearing on the big night.
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now?
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this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines for you. prominent political activist in egypt has been sentenced to five years in jail for breaking a law that bans protests without a police permit. at the oscars eddie redmayne wins best actor for "the theory of everything" while julianne moore picks up best actress for "still alice" and best film goes to "birdman." now, another headline for greece today with the government sending european union official a list of reforms it's willing to make in return for an
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extension of a loan. that list has been submitted, but not yet been confirmed what's in it. last week, the greek finance minister, yanis varoufakis agreed of an extension of its bailout program, on the condition that its agreements are accepted. the greek government is estimated to have a total amount of debt of around $323 billion or around $365 billion. by far the biggest amount, 60% is owed to the eurozone. other big questions include the international monetary fund european central bank, and greece also owes around 50 billion in bonds. some numbers there for you. well talks last friday in brussels between officials from the 19 euro members concluded with an agreement to exthe end greece's bailout for four months. but it gave the new greek government until the end of
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today to complete a list of policies, in return for the continued funding. that's been done our finance chief will decide will the proposals do go far enough or whether they trigger another round of emergency talks this week. greece is a long way from being out of the woods yet. >> we're really at the very beginning of this very long process. market volatility is likely to continue, but it was very important to reach an agreement on friday because otherwise, banks have been under tremendous pressure this week. they were losing deposit. they were at the mercy of the ecb. at least now they've bought some time and hopefully, they will get an agreement the next few days. >> our correspondent mark lowen is in athens. >> reporter: another important day for greece here as the government submits a list of the conditions it is willing to fulfill in return for the four-month extension of that loan agreement. and the list will go to brussels
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and to greece's creditors, the imf, the european central bank the european commission. they will evaluate the list of conditions and they will give a verdict tomorrow tuesday, as to whether it meets what they believe greece should do. has greece compromised or caved in? here to discuss a little bit further is a journalist with the newspaper affiliated with the governing party syriza. what do you expect to be on this list of conditions? >> definitely there's going to be a plan to talk about tax evasion, oil smugglers, to fight the local oil garrison, who has had enormous gains during the past five years, and of course to -- reforms in order to tackle the humanitarian crisis. >> and the greek government says it is now co-authors of its own destiny. but isn't this just simply caving into terms of the original bailout? >> no. the original bailout had cuts.
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there would be no more cuts or pensions for wages. there would be no more measures inflicted on us. it's for the first time that the greek government actually negotiated. and agreed with the european union, or at least agreed pretty much it's for the first time that we're not tenants, we are being regarded as equals. it's the first time that that's happened. >> reporter: and do you think that the majority of greek voters, the voters of cities that support the government on this, even though it has been forced to roll back a little bit. >> i think that syriza has shown a responsible ability to negotiate. the majority of the greek people want to remain in the euro zone which is very important. and second syriza has -- doesn't have the approval of its voters, but have around 86% of approval. it's a widely accepted government, especially given the
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past five years. no government has had this much approval. >> thank you very much, indeed. if the institutions don't like what they see, well the deal could collapse. if there needs to be fine tuning, greece has until april to do so. we could be back here in two months' time for the next chapter in the greek is aga. >> mark lowen in athens. back to the oscars. in case you haven't heard, here's where the night's biggest awards ended up. the results are in and these are the actors and the movies that have taken the top honors at this year's oscars. the top prize of the night went to "birdman," as it won the award for the best picture of 2013. the oscar for best actor went to eddie redmayne for his portrayal of stephen hawking in "the theory of everything." jk simmons took the best support supporting actor for his frightening display in "whiplash." the best actress oscar was given to the award's favorite julianne moore, for her role in
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"still alice," and patricia arquette's 12-year-long role in "boyhood" earned her the best supporting actress oscar. the best director award went to alejandro g. inarritu for "birdman." and the award for best foreign language film went to the polish film "ida." now, that's the story of who won what on the night, but in case you're interested on what everyone was wearing, here's a quick look for you at some of them. well, this is "gone girl" star rosalinde pike wearing a lovely red dress, red was also the choice for dakota the "50 shades of grey" star. krissy teegan showed her background in modeling as she took her turn on the red carpet. jennifer lopez caught on this
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gown, for her turn announcing one of the awards. one of oscar's best actor winner julianne moore, went for a white and black number as did patricia arquette who took best supporting actress, and that means kira nightly missed out, despite being nominated. she chose this dress to cover her baby bump. men have a few less options. best actor, eddie redmayne shows an oscar can definitely improve any outfit. best supporting actor, jk simmons, but jared leto stood out the most with a powder blue tux and shiny shoes. some celebrations are still going on. the biggest afterparty hosted by "vanity fair." amongst those there, best actor, eddie redmayne. >> eddie, congratulations! what was going through your mind when you stepped on that stage and held that oscar. show us it show us it!
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>> look it exists! it's real. you know, i couldn't articulate it. it was like a frenzy of virtually every single human emotion possible all in about 30 seconds. >> you described yourself as a custodian of that award. >> i feel like there were particularly making this film i spent four months going to london, met many people their families, and not only them but of course the hawking family. it's definitely a sad story. >> eddie redmayne with the news that he won. according to the chinese earlier, the year of the sheep began last week and the animals have never been more popular across asia. one cafe in the south korean capital seoul is proving a particular hit, having given the flock free rein to wander amongst the tables. steve evans went to visit them to see if they could give him any idea what the future might hold. >> hello. this is a cafe in seoul.
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a trendy cafe. it's got a bit of a gimmick for the year of the sheep. it's got sheep in. it's a gimmick, as i say, but we're going to go along with it a bit. first of all, what does it mean in terms of the zodiac for the year of the sheep. let me quote the zodiac. the year of the sheep is for people who describe it as elegant, intelligent, dependable, calm individuals, who are very creative they can be shy, pessimistic, and puzzled about life it says and prefer to be alone. so that's the year of the sheep. but there is also whether you accept this or not is another matter. but there is also in any new year, a time of looking forward. that's what it's about. and in this country, in korea, it's about two things. in south korea, clearly, it's about the economy. there have been jitters about the economy in 2014 and those jitters continue. people are worried about growth.
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growth will be something like 3.5%. tidy growth but maybe a bit less. not so good. the other thing, of course is this divided peninsula. what's going to happen between north and south korea? both pyongyang and seoul here will be making softer noises. they seem to want to get together. the americans are a bit tougher. so, what's going to happen with the economy? decent growth but we're not certain about it. sorry, sorry, sorry. and also maybe softer rhetoric will turn into some kind of represhma between south and north. that's what the new year might hold. and the good thing for these, is that lamb is not really eaten in korea. >> steve evans. i'm so very worried about the hygiene implications of that cafe. but anyway they're having fun
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in seoul. i'm on twitter. you can follow me. i'm @geeta guru-murthy. this is bbc world news and i'm back tomorrow. see you then.
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so call about the colonial penn program, and ask one of their representatives about a plan that meets your needs. i'm definitely gonna call about the colonial penn program. hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm lucy hockings. a night of politics and a few surprises at the oscars. "birdman" swoops in to take best picture. and passionate pleas for equality and change that many people are talking about. >> it's our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the united states of america. another deadline for greece as it tries to avoid bankruptcy. we'll look at how the new

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